Environmental Science Syllabus

                                   Environmental Science                               

Class Policies and Procedures

 

 

 

Mr. John Proctor 931-285-2300 ext. 4103

Email: jproctor@mauryk12.org  

 

Materials:  3 ring binder with paper, Calculator, Graph Paper, Pens, Pencils

 

Attendance:  Students are expected to be in class daily and seated quietly immediately after the tardy bell rings.  Tardiness is unacceptable and if repeated will result in disciplinary action (This includes returning from lunch!!) 

 

Housekeeping:  Dispose of all trash or waste materials in the appropriate container.  Drinks and snacks are not permitted in the classroom or the lab area at any time.  Bottled water is acceptable in the classroom area only.

 

Missed Work: Each student will have 3 days following each absence to request and complete missed assignments. Any work not turned in on the 4th day following the absence will result in a lower grade. Zeroes are unacceptable and must be made-up. Students will have an incomplete if they are missing work. Missed notes can be copied from another classmate or students are welcome to ask me if they cannot find a classmate to copy.

Retake Policy

  1. Any student who scores above 70% may not retake.
  2. Tests will be given one time during class.  If a student makes below a 70% they are required to retake the test.  In order to complete the retake.
  1. First Retake -- For a grade of 75%
  1. Students must view the links to the below and list three points that they learned.  

 

  1. Second Retake -- For a grade of 70%
  1. Students must view resources on their standards from Khan Academy, YouTube's Crash Course or Fuse School, or Bozeman Science or other appropriate areas of the web.

 

 

Lab Fee:  There is a lab fee of $15.00 assessed to each student.  This fee is used to purchase materials for each lab exercise.  Lab fees must be paid within 2 weeks following the beginning of the semester.  This fee is a necessity for the chemistry department to provide the best opportunity for each student to have hands-on science learning.

 

Expectations: 

  1. Be Ready
  2. Be Respectful
  3. Be Responsible

 

 

Teacher Conference:  I will be available for conferences from 2:45p.m.-3:15p.m. (Tuesday through Thursday and also during my planning period daily—4th Block I encourage any student or parent to schedule conferences or email me if you have any questions or concerns.

 

 

Curriculum Map as follows: Hampshire Unit School Curriculum Map

Environmental Science

 

Semester 1: August – December

 

Disciplinary Core Idea:  ESS2: Earth’s Systems

Topic

Standards

Atmosphere

2) Considering Earth’s position within our solar system, use a model to demonstrate the causes of day length, seasons, and climate.

3) Analyze the composition of the Earth’s atmosphere. Obtain information and use graphs to observe patterns regarding stability and change within the Earth’s atmospheric composition (O2, N2, CO2, etc.) over geologic time.

4) Differentiate weather and climate and analyze and interpret data examining naturally occurring patterns pertaining to each.

Geosphere

1) Research the development of the theory of plate tectonics. Use the theory to construct an explanation for how changes in Earth’s crust cause mountain formation, volcanoes, earthquakes, and tsunamis. Provide evidence to support the explanation using information pertaining to plate boundary types (divergent, convergent, transform).

6) Develop a model to explain soil formation and the flow of matter in the rock cycle.

Hydrosphere

5) Plan and carry out an investigation examining the chemical and physical properties of water and the impact of water on Earth’s topography. Analyze data and share findings.

 

DCI:  LS2: Ecosystems: Interactions, Energy, and Dynamics

Topic

Standards

Ecosystems and Energy Flow

3) Using mathematical models, support arguments regarding the effects of biotic and abiotic factors on carrying capacity for populations within an ecosystem.

4) Compare and contrast production (photosynthesis, chemosynthesis) and respiratory (aerobic respiration, anaerobic respiration, consumption, decomposition) processes responsible for the cycling of matter and flow of energy through an ecosystem. Using evidence, construct an argument regarding the importance of homeostasis in maintaining these processes in ecosystems.

5) Use a mathematical model to explain energy flow through an ecosystem. Using the first and second laws of thermodynamics, construct an explanation for: A) necessity for constant energy input; B) limitations on energy transfer from one trophic level to the next; and, C) limitations on number of trophic levels that can be supported.

Biomes

1) Using a variety of data sources, construct an explanation for the impact of climate, latitude, altitude, geology, and hydrology patterns on plant and animal life in various terrestrial biomes.

2) Develop an explanation of behavioral and physical adaptations organisms have for life in aquatic habitats with varying chemical and physical features.

Biosuccession

7) Examine stability and change within an ecosystem by using a model of succession (primary or secondary) to predict impacts of disruption on an ecosystem.

Biogeochemical Cycling

6) Evaluate the interdependence among major biogeochemical cycles (water, carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus) in an ecosystem and recognize the importance each cycle has in maintaining ecosystem stability.

 

DCI:  LS4: Biological Change: Unity and Diversity

Topic

Standards

Biodiversity

1) Construct an explanation based on scientific evidence for mechanisms of natural selection that result in behavioral, anatomical, and physiological adaptations in populations.

2) Justify claims with scientific evidence that changes in environmental conditions lead to speciation and extinction.

3) Evaluate the impact of habitat fragmentation and destruction, invasive species, overharvesting, pollution, and climate change on biodiversity (genetic, species, and ecosystem).

4) Engage in argument from scientific evidence critiquing effectiveness of the Endangered Species Act. Give specific examples to support your argument.

 

DCI:  ESS3: Earth and Human Activity

Topic

Standards

Human Population

2) Interpret graphical data representing global human population growth over time. Look for patterns within this data and construct possible explanations for the patterns. Revise the explanations as needed based on research.

3) Obtain and evaluate information regarding demographics for a variety of countries. Construct an explanation for varying fertility rates and life expectancies between countries and throughout human history. Taking into account demographic transition, predict what trends are likely to occur in various countries over time.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Semester 2: January – May

 

Disciplinary Core Idea:  ESS3: Earth and Human Activity

Water and Land Resources

Topic

Standards

Water/Land

  • Uses
  • Management
  • Conservation/Preservation
  • Human activity

1) Research Earth’s natural resources (renewable and nonrenewable resources). Construct an argument from evidence supporting the claim that a particular type of resource is important for humans.

4) Gather, organize, analyze, and present data on current land use trends by humans. Based on analysis, predict future trends.

5) Plan and carry out an investigation examining best management practices in water usage, agriculture, forestry, urban/suburban development, mining, or fishing and communicate findings.

10) Using scientific data, analyze effectiveness of conservation versus preservation efforts. Obtain and communicate information on organizations involved in protecting natural resources.

Food/Agriculture

6) Use a model to make predictions regarding the impact of topsoil loss due to erosion resulting from human activity. Design, evaluate, and revise a solution to preserve topsoil.

7) Construct an argument including claim, evidence, and scientific reasoning regarding the impact of the Green Revolution on agricultural practices, food availability, and the environment.

8) Research information on the environmental impacts of genetically modified organisms and engage in debate regarding pros and cons of this agricultural technology.

Forestry

9) Evaluate ecosystem services provided by forests ecosystems. Construct an explanation for human impact on these services.

Mining

11) Define problems and suggest solutions associated with using, conserving, and recycling energy and mineral resources taking into account economic, social, and environmental costs and benefits.

 

Energy Resources and Consumption

Topic

Standards

Energy Resources

  • Nonrenewable
  • Renewable

1) Research Earth’s natural resources (renewable and nonrenewable resources). Construct an argument from evidence supporting the claim that a particular type of resource is important for humans.

 

Energy Consumption

11) Define problems and suggest solutions associated with using, conserving, and recycling energy and mineral resources taking into account economic, social, and environmental costs and benefits

Carbon Footprint

18) Use mathematics to calculate ecological footprints. Develop a personal plan for reducing your impact on the environment.

Future Trends

12) Ask questions about technology needed to develop alternative energy sources and obtain information from various sources to answer those questions.

Waste Production and Pollution

Topic

Standards

Land

13) Analyze and interpret data on the effects of land, water, and air pollution on the environment and on human health. Propose solutions for minimizing pollution from specific sources.

14) Obtain and communicate information on environmental laws pertaining to the regulation of pollution and on regulatory agencies. Provide a specific example of how a given business/industry would comply with such regulations.

15) Evaluate current methods of waste management and reduction and design possible improvements.

Air

13) Analyze and interpret data on the effects of land, water, and air pollution on the environment and on human health. Propose solutions for minimizing pollution from specific sources.

14) Obtain and communicate information on environmental laws pertaining to the regulation of pollution and on regulatory agencies. Provide a specific example of how a given business/industry would comply with such regulations.

15) Evaluate current methods of waste management and reduction and design possible improvements.

Water

13) Analyze and interpret data on the effects of land, water, and air pollution on the environment and on human health. Propose solutions for minimizing pollution from specific sources.

14) Obtain and communicate information on environmental laws pertaining to the regulation of pollution and on regulatory agencies. Provide a specific example of how a given business/industry would comply with such regulations.

15) Evaluate current methods of waste management and reduction and design possible improvements.

 

Climate Change

Topic

Standards

Ozone

16) Obtain, evaluate, and communicate scientific information tracing the breakdown of ozone caused by chlorofluorocarbons and the effectiveness of efforts to address this environmental problem.

Human Impact

17) Using mathematics and computational thinking, analyze data linking human activity to climate change. Design solutions to address human impacts on climate change.

 

DCI:  ETS2: Links Among Engineering, Technology, Science, and Society

1) Engage in argument from evidence on the role engineering and technology play in a sustainable human society.  

 2) Research and communicate information on an environmental science career. Analyze the role of society, engineering, technology, and science in that career. 

 

DCI:  ETS3: Applications of Science

1) Plan and carry out an investigation of a local ecosystem to assess human impacts. Based on your findings, design and evaluate a solution to minimize impacts.